Posts Tagged ‘Warhammer 40000’

This post will mostly be about the fabled hairspray technique.  Believe it or not, I’ve never actually used it before.  Not through not wanting to, just never having an opportunity.  Plus I’ve never actually been convinced of how successful it is as a technique.  Whats always concerned me is removing the sand, salt, sugar or whatever it is you choose to use.  So, this post is mostly about my adventures with this technique.

So what compelled me to use it?  Well, I want the exterior to look like its rusting.  When you see rust on car, trucks etc it generally starts at weld points, joints etc.  To replicated this I couldn’t use the sponge technique.  When you apply a sponge with paint on it, it is applied to raised surfaces.  Not internal corners or where two materials would theoretically join.  By using the sand and my applicator, I was able to ‘mask’ these joints using sand.  Hence, why I opted to explore using this technique.

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My chosen hairspray… VO5 sounded cool.  I made a small applicator out of paper to assist with more accurate placement of the sand.  By the way, I got the sand from a hardware store.  Nothing special.

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Making an applicator seemed like a good idea at the time…

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Did it work?  I think so.  However before I went hell for leather, I painted a small piece (below) and experimented with how I’d remove the sand.  Remember, I’ve actually based some of the sections of this model with craft wood.  I’ve also attached the basing material with PVA glue.  Both of these materials react poorly when exposed to moisture.

I wasn’t too concerned with the vast majority of the pieces of this kit getting wet.  They’re resin after all.  However I was concerned with the modules  This meant I had to be very careful removing the sand.

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As you can see from the two test pieces, the technique is quite affective.  The only thing I found I had to be careful of was using too much water.  This caused the paint to soften and come off.  So I found the best way was to apply a light coat of water, let it sit for a minute or two, and then with a tooth brush and wide flat paint brush, gently remove the sand.  It comes off quite easily.  Then I just gave it a quick rinse.

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After I was satisfied with how the technique was going to work with the model, I then went ahead and added the sand to the rest of the pieces then painted them their top coat.  I was really happy with how it was all coming together at this stage.

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So, as you can see this base is really looking the business.  If I’d had my time over again I would have done a few things slightly differently.  The first one being not so liberal with the sand.  It’s a very small point however there are areas where I feel I went a little over the top.  The other thing I would have done is sealed the brown coat with a clear gloss.  I think this would have assisted in allowing the sand to come off with greater ease.  I don’t know this for certain, just theorising.

So from here, I’ll be applying a clear gloss coat to the model surfaces and applying oils…  until next post!

Thanks for dropping in

John

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Welcome back to another Anphelion Base update.  Things are getting pretty serious now!  The models been cleaned and assembled (years of therapy ahead over that one).  It’s been based and undercoated, then the interior was painted.  Its now time to mask the interior and begin to paint the exterior.

First up, masking

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The photos of this stage will be fairly self explanatory, so I’ll dispense with the commentary

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A pretty light on post.  I didn’t want to spend too much time describing what is essentially sticking tape to a model then spraying it.  However what I will say is that the model isn’t going to be brown.  This is the undercoat.  I’ll be using the hairspray technique as one of the weathering stages of this model.  But that will be in the next post…

Until then, thanks for dropping in

John

So, this is part two of this project.  Basically we’re up to under coating at this stage.  Assembly is a distant memory, however I feel that it will haunt me for the rest of my days.  It was seriously hard work.  A task I’m thankful I’ll probably only ever do once in my life.

Ok, lets get down to business.  One thing I really wanted to do to the landing pad is not to have a gap between the ground and the underside of the landing platform.  I also wanted to make whatever I put in that gap be suitable and fitting with the character of the base, and finally, be simple and easy to produce (I’m quite a lazy bugger you see)

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So what I settled on was getting some of the old Necromunda bulkheads.  Remember these?

Big Jim, if you’re reading this, thanks for donating them.

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So basically I chopped a bunch of them up up to make a panel wide enough to span the gap between the support pylons on the landing pad.IMG_339053

Because I needed about eight lengths, I decided to make a quick one piece mold of the newly constructed panel so I can make the appropriate amount of casts.

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And the cast panel.  These will come in handy later on too.  They have a lot of character and will make useful bits later on…

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I also did a test paint scheme piece for the base.  I want it to look very neglected (it is abandoned after all)  I like how it came out.

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Here is a close up of some of the scatter terrain.  I really like the shipping container looking objects.  Again, more Necromunda bulkheads glued together and cast.

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The cast panel in place on the landing pad.  In case you’re wondering, the basing material I use is kitty litter, and a type of small rocks that are used in reptile enclosures.  I just like the consistency.

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The rest of these photos are of the base assembled and undercoated.  As I’ve mentioned, getting it to this stage was a massive mission.  However it’s really pleasing to see it at this stage.  I have to admit, when I saw it all assembled like this, it really renewed my enthusiasm for the project.  It was waining…

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The next few photos reveal the interior.  I’ve started undercoating it grey because I plan on painting the interior white.

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So, next step is to start working on the interior.  This is going to be a pretty straight forward part actually.  Except for the interior panel inserts.  Particularly the ones I’ve chosen for the ‘quad gun’ and ‘comms relay’ controls.

Ok, thanks for dropping in,

Until next post

John

I haven’t really done that many posts on this blog that are actually a work in progress post.  Since moving from forums to my own blog I’ve mostly just brought you either finished projects or tutorials.  So I thought I’d mix things up a bit and bring you a series of posts around my new Forge World Greater Daemon of Khorne.  If you read my previous post you’d know that a good friend of mine actually gave me this model after he’d had if for a year or two and didn’t think he’d ever get to painting it.  Obviously I accepted his extreme generosity and ever since have been thinking through various ways I might approach painting this epic bad guy.  And a bad ass he is, make no mistake.  This is one seriously amazing sculpt and its a real pleasure studying the detail on it.  I really admire the talent and years of honing skill that it would take to produce something like this.

So lets get into it shall we?

As with any model this size (or indeed any model for that matter) preparation and having a plan are essential.  In terms of preparation ensure that the model is going to fit together properly, be sturdy and have no gaps etc.  In terms of a plan, how is it going to be painted?, whats the base going to look like?, are you going to paint it in pieces or as an assembled model?  Many of these questions need to be considered and answered clearly before you embark on a project.

For this model, I actually plan on using it in my upcoming World Eaters army for when I feel like running them as CSM, so it seems appropriate to have a Greater Daemon and also a few Blood Letters for good measure.

Apart from that, preparation is the next aspect to be considered.  Being such a massive model (its huge) I want to ensure that I’m not relying on simply super glue to keep the model together nor the simple joints that Forge World have created for the model.  Having strong bonds along key stress points is an important consideration with models like this.

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So for all of the main joints on this kit, which are the left hip, both wrist joints, hips and wings, I have used 2mm spring steel to add that extra degree of support that I know I’ll be grateful for after I’ve used that bad ass in a few games.  Forgeworld Greater Daemon of Khorn WIP 2

No to rely totally on the strength of the steel, I also like to drill additional “key” holes.  What this does is allows the epoxy resin that I use to bond the pieces together to seep into the holes and assist with strengthening the mechanical bond of the pieces.  Forgeworld Greater Daemon of Khorn WIP 3

For this model I’m actually magnetising it to its base.  Why you ask?  Well its for two reasons, the first is to facilitate with painting and the second is a secret that you’ll just have to wait and see.  One aspect of this model that I’m not entirely happy with is the models attention to something thats in its immediate foreground.  Its so stooped over that its almost looking at its feet.  As I’ve mentioned before, I suspect but don’t know for certain that this model was sculpted to be posed with Hector Rex.  Hence why its appears to have its attention focused on something about man sized more or less at its feet.  I wanted to overcome this to a degree so that someone looking at the model can get a better look at the detail of the models front.  So I used cork floor tiles to “jack up” the front left foot, while keeping the back foot at normal base level.  It’s just a subtle thing, but as you’ll see it makes a massive difference in how the model now interacts with its audience.
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Just getting the pose right.  Forgeworld Greater Daemon of Khorn WIP 5

So detail of the base.  I want it to look like a hellish battle field.  Only the most nightmarish of battle fields would enable a daemon of this stature be summoned.  Note the crushed Space MarineForgeworld Greater Daemon of Khorn WIP 6

A better view of the base.  I used a lot of different materials on this base, cork floor tiles, train set ballast, skulls and ceramic bricks from Secret Weapon Miniatures and as you’ll see in other pictures, Forge World brass etched barbed wire and an Imperial Eagle.

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When it comes to glueing this pieces together I like to use small cramps to ensure that a strong bond it made.  Its a bit of an involved process but the results speak for themselves.Forgeworld Greater Daemon of Khorn WIP 8

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The base now with added barbed wire and the Greater Daemon stepping on a damaged Imperial EagleForgeworld Greater Daemon of Khorn WIP 12

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This shot was taken just prior to undercoating.  As I mentioned there were a few pieces missing from the model so I had to make a few molds of those pieces today and then cast them up, if you look very closely you can see where they are as they’re white resin.  Forgeworld Greater Daemon of Khorn WIP 14Ok, thats me for the time being.  Hope you enjoyed this WIP post.  I think I might make it a bit more of a habit in the future.

Comments always welcome, and thanks for dropping in

John

 

This weekend at RAAF Base Amberly will see the annual Anzac Cup hosted by WW40k being held.  Its a 1950pt Warhammer 40,000 6th Ed tournament,  more details can be found here.  I’m playing with my Carcharodons and I’m looking forward to participating as the team who ran the ADFWGA Championships are behind this event, and if their last tournament was anything to go by it should be an awesome weekend.

The organiser of the event has asked me to bring along my Forge World Realm of Battle Cityscape board to have set up for display as well as some of my other models, including my Titans and a few others pieces from my collection.  So if you are able to drop in on the Saturday or Sunday and have a look it would be great to have your company.  As usual there will be a strong fund raising focus for Legacy over the weekend so if you can a small donation would be greatly appreciated by families of serving and past Defence Force Personnel.

Entry is free and there will surly be some amazingly painted armies battling it out over arguably the best tournament scenery in Australia for the Anzac Cup.  I’m sure its going to be a great weekend.

If you click on this LINK it will take you to the Google map for RAAF Base Amberly’s location if you are not familiar with the area.  Also below is a picture of where the event is being held on the Base.  The good thing is that you won’t need a Military ID to get in as the tournament isn’t being held in the secure area, so there will be no hassles for you coming along.  The only stipulation is that you cant wear thongs (flip flops for my American readers, incase you think Aussies walk around wearing G-Strings everywhere)

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So it’d be great to see you along over the weekend and I’m sure you’ll be impressed with what you’ll see.  If you are not able to make it along, you’ll be able to live vicariously through my post tournament review that will surly follow next week sometime.

Hope to see you then, thanks for dropping in

John

So ever since I did the post on How to paint World Eater Space Marines I have a lot of positive feed back, in fact its been a very popular post.  One question that I’ve continually had was “how did you paint the face?” So I thought I’d do a quick tutorial on how to paint faces to a good table top standard.  Believe it or not, its not that hard and with a little patience and practice you’ll dramatically improve the presentiment of any miniature where flesh tones are present.

So lets take a look at the process.

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Step 1.

For the tutorial I’ll be using the old Citadel range of paints.  I do like the new range, however I’m buying to replace them with the new ones as I go so I’ve still got a fair few of the old range on hand.  But if you use the Citadel conversion chart if you don’t have any of the old paints you should be golden.

The paints & materials I’ve used are

  • Abaddon Black – Undercoat and detail
  • Tallarn Flesh – Base coat and component for highlights
  • Dwarf Flesh – For highlighting
  • Red Gore – A component colour for the lips
  • Ogryn Flesh – Base coat wash
  • Devlen Mud – Shading
  • White Scar – Eyes etc
  • W & N No 1 Brush
  • Marines Head – I like mounting pieces on tooth pics for ease of handling

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Step 2.  Undercoat

I’ve used Abaddon Black applied with an Air Brush, or use a spray can.  This is important and many of the small details on the face can be erased or compromised if you don’t apply the paint thinly enough.  I’m not saying it can’t be done with a brush, but it just makes your job harder if you do.

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Step 3.  Base coat

Again I’ve applied Tallarn Flesh with an air brush for the same reason that I applied Abaddon Black with an air brush, so as not to compromise any of the fine detail on the face.

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Step 4.  Wash

Using my W & N no 1 brush I applied a liberal amount of wash.  Don’t be scared to do this as you’ll find that when the medium dries (evaporates) all that will be left is the pigment in the recesses.  You want that to create definition.
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Step 5.  Re-apply the base coat

This is where you need to be mindful of a few things.  The first one is paint viscosity, and the second one is your brush condition.  Let me explain.  Where a lot of people fall down when painting flesh is that the paint has already started to dry when its being applied.  This makes the paint lumpy and has an inconsistent appearance in its application.  In some climates where the air is dry (< 30% humidity) you may need to use a wet pallet.  Or just do what I do and take a blob of paint out of the bottle (I live in a humid climate), put it on my pallet and mix in a bit of paint thinner.  This is really important, especially for skin tones, the reason is that our skin is sort of translucent and when we paint it to re-create that effect, we need to simulate this and the best way to do that is to make the paint thin.  I’ll get into more detail on this later, but for now, just make sure that your paint it thinned down a little so it flows better.

The second point you need to be aware of is your brush condition.  There are two aspects of this, the first is that your brush is set up to facilitate capillary action, and the second one is that the tip of the brush is the right shape.  Many painters don’t use their brush the way its meant to be used, and that is having a nice amount of paint on the whole brush (bristles) and then shape the brush tip so that it makes a nice fine point for painting.  A lot of guys I see dip the tip of their brush in the paint and use only that part.  This seriously limits the full capability of the brush and you are doing yourself a big disservice.  To help your brush facilitate capillary action, just make sure that before you dip it in paint (thinned down I hope) that you first dip your paint brush in some clean paint thinners first.  Remove the excess with a tissue or something then dip the paint brush in your thinned paint, using the same tissue shape the bristles so that you have a nice point.

You can now pick out the raised areas of the face with the Tallarn Flesh.  Before you do this take a few moments to consider where you’d like the paint to go by studying the face and its contours.  By having a plan of where you’d like the paint to do will dramatically improve your results.

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Step 6.  First Highlight

Mixing about 70% Tallarn Flesh with 30% Dwarf Flesh, begin highlighting the areas of the face that would naturally catch the light.  So areas like the ears, nose, chin, cheeks, brow.  Again, make sure you follow the points I make in Step 5 about paint viscosity and having your brush set up properly.  Paint viscosity is important for the next three stages.  As I mentioned before, skin is sort of translucent, so when you paint flesh tones, try and make your paint go on in very thin layers so that the edge of each layer of paint isn’t too contrasted against the previous one, and allows its colour to be blended with the previous colour that was applied.

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Step 7.  Second Highlight

Mixing about 30% Tallarn Flesh with 70% Dwarf Flesh, begin refining the highlighting of the previous areas of the face that you worked on in Step 6. Again, make sure you follow the points I make in Step 5 about paint viscosity and having your brush set up properly.

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Step 8.  Final Highlight

With straight Dwarf Flesh go and pick out the final areas where you want attention to be drawn to.  Tip of the nose, ears, brow and top of the cheeks.

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Step 9.  Lips

With a a mixture of about 60% Tallarn Flesh, and 40% Red Gore, apply a small amount to the lower lip.  This is very subtle but crucial to achieving a more realistic effect.

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Step 10.  Eye Shading

Place a small amount of Devlan Mud in each of the eye areas and a small amount under the bottom lip.  Again a subtle but crucial step.

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Step 11.  Pick out Details

Paint the actual eyes black in readiness for the white to be applied, paint around the collar, neck brace etc and the small stud on his forehead.  Highlight the collar etc as you would normally.
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Step 12.  Finished

Paint in the eyes with white, followed by a small dot of back.  This may take several attempts to get right.  Pick out the service stud with your choice of silver and finish up any other details you’d like attention paid to.
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So there you have it.  It’s doubtful that you’ll win a Golden Daemon trophy with this scheme, but it will with any luck improve the quality of your table top miniatures.

A few points to remember about painting flesh.  The first is no matter what tone of flesh you are wanting to achieve, always start with a warm flesh tone.  For example, if you look at the picture below of my Iron Hands Librarian, you’ll see he’s quite pale.  I still used Tallarn Flesh as the base colour, I just used a mixture of grey and bone to dull down the warmth of Tallarn Flesh.  This is a convention to be mindful of when painting flesh tones.  It seems that our eye is programmed to see flesh tones in a certain way and we accept simulations of flesh tones better when they have a warm base to start with.

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Thats me for now.  Hope you’ve found this helpful, and until next time chat later.

John Sutton, Brisbane, Qld

So I knocked this out this morning in a spurt of painting enthusiasm.  The truth be told, he’s been sitting on my painting table (we’ll in a dust proof box on a shelf next to my painting table) for close to 18 months now.  I’ve had this idea for how I wanted him to look for some time as his original purpose was to be apart of the “Death Knell” Apoc 40k formation for Space Marines.  Basically it consists of 5 x 5 man squads of TH/SS Terminators with a Lysander proxy, a Contemptor Dreadnought in a Lucious droppod and a Librarian in Terminator Armour with a Storm Shield.  It’s a pretty bad ass formation and really puts a dampener on your opponents day when it rocks up.  (To announce its arrival you use a orbital bombardment to “clear” the area where all the Terminators arrive)

For some reason I just never got around to painting him, and then when I finished my new storm shield after re-tooling the pattern from the original I did close to two years ago I got inspired to finish it off.  To be honest, I’m glad I did because its come out much better than I’d expected.  I even tried my hand at doing NMN with an airbrush on the Librarians Force Sword.

As you can see, I removed the models force stave? and replaced it with a massive force sword from the Grey Knight plastic kit I think, and I exchanged his “talk to the hand” hand with a storm shield.  In game terms this seems to be the most popular load out for this type of character when he’s rolling in his Terminator armour.  The pose actually looks quite good, better than I was expecting.

The pictures are not to a standard that I’m completely happy with because I’m having trouble with my camera at the moment and need to sit down and figure out whats going on but I haven’t been bothered to.  So I’ll have to look into it in the next week or so because its really getting on my nerves.  Pro tip, don’t let people fool around with your camera.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Librarian in Terminator Armour 3 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOk, thats it for me now.  It’s coming up to Easter and over the holidays myself and Aaron from Forlorn Hope will be getting together for some hardcore, ungreased, man dollie action and taking the Cityscape board out for its madien voyage.  The plan is to have a 1950 point game on it with my Carcharodons V his Tyranids or Death Korps of Krieg (or both on separate occasions)  So my intention is to bring you a full battle report detailing blow by blow action with pictures accompanying that will melt your brain.  I’m really looking forward to this and it should be a lot of fun.

Until then, thanks for dropping in

John